Halitosis

We were about a year into Dad’s move and life at the Home was going well. There were days in the beginning that we almost felt as if Dad didn’t belong there, that perhaps he could/should have been living in his own home, leading a fully independent life. Then something would happen that would snap us back to the reality of his LBD. This time it was halitosis.

It was Saturday and I had stopped by the Home to pick him up mid-morning to run our usual errands. The weather was beautiful and we had the whole day ahead of us. When I arrived at his room, he was just finishing up his post-breakfast, morning routine. I looked around his bathroom to see if he needed any toiletries while we were out. Everything seemed to be in order; toothpaste, shampoo, soap, razors – check. Even the prescription steroid cream that the staff applied to sooth his itchy skin spots that the daily memory patches left behind was neatly organized in his medicine cabinet. Ready to go, we started to head out the door. That’s when he told me that his mouth hurt. I asked;

“Did you burn your mouth on some soup or something?”

“No, I don’t think so…”

Hmm I thought, he probably just burned his mouth on something hot or perhaps abraded it on something dry and scratchy and forgot. As his dementia started to progress a bit, I was beginning to brush off some of the (erroneous) things that Dad had begun to point out or talk about and quickly dismissed the remark, thinking it would probably subside or be forgotten, as would often happen with such topics as the day went along.

Dad climbed into the car, put his seatbelt on and we were off. It wasn’t until several minutes later that I could smell this horrific odor. As I continued driving I noticed that the smell got worse, especially when Dad was talking. It was so atrocious, I had to immediately put the windows down to air out the car – I’m talking ‘knock you over with a feather’ potent. It couldn’t possibly be his breath I thought, Dad never had bad breath that I could remember. Whatever it was though, it was FOUL. We arrived at our first stop and I was now sure that the odor was his breath. I asked him to open his mouth and that’s when I could see the little white pustules on top of his tongue.

“What the heck is that?!” I exclaimed.

“Is what?” he asked, as I turned my nose in the opposite direction to lessen my exposure to the offensive smell.

“I think you have some kind of infection on your tongue or something, maybe we should have you gargle with some warm salt water when we get back.”

As soon as we got back to our house, I prepared some warm salt water and had Dad gargle. He indicated that his mouth felt better, so I asked the staff at the Home to continue the gargles for the next day or so. However by day-2, his mouth looked no better and I knew it was time to see the doctor.

“What do you think it is?”

“Looks (and smells) like a fungal infection to me”

“How the heck would Dad have ended up with an oral fungal infection?

“I have absolutely no idea.”

“Dad – any ideas?

“No honey, I don’t.”

It took a couple of prescriptions to clear it up. We finally went with a cocktail of Maalox, nystatin and sucralfate that I had remembered making up for some radiation cancer patients struggling with mouth ulcerations. That finally seemed to do the trick and brought relief to poor Dad’s oral discomfort within the first couple of treatments – hooray, no more halitosis!

It wasn’t until several weeks later on another one of our daily adventures, that Dad brought the subject of his oral fungal infection back up;

“I think I know what happened to that thing with my mouth.”

“Really – what?”

“I think I was brushing my teeth with that cream the staff puts on my itchy skin”

Holy crap I thought, I bet he’s absolutely right! Despite some of the LBD effects we were starting to see in Dad, he still had the wherewithal to figure out what happened and he was spot on. The toothpaste and steroid cream tubes were both kept in his bathroom medicine cabinet and were similar sizes. Between his impaired eye sight (macular degeneration) and the dementia, he had probably been grabbing the wrong tube and brushing his teeth with the steroid cream for some time – yuck! Needless to say, we started to keep the cream in the medication room from that point forward. This was just one of the first of many things to come that confirmed our decision to place Dad in Assisted Living. Regardless of how great his good days were, I would hate to imagine what other kinds of trouble he might get himself into in a private home.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s